Sold Gallery

These pages display a number of the rare items that I have had the pleasure of selling. To view more details and a larger photograph please click on the thumbnail picture.

1881 Canadian Militia Officer Scarlet Uniform C.18

1881 Canadian Militia Officer Scarlet Uniform C.18

Offered is the standard pattern Infantry Officer Tunic c.1881 to a Lieutenant. These uniforms are still the pattern of choice to this day for line infantry units who continue to wear full dress. The decorative cuffs were introduced with the 1869 tunic, but were simplified in the 1881 cut. They were still decorated in a manner that distinguishes the officers as either subalterns or field officer rank with more embellishments for the senior. The rank was moved from the collar to the shoulders in 1881 and the collars were simplified and left blank. The rank structure identification changed as a consequence of the move to the bullion shoulder boards. The uniform skirt was slightly shorter and the fit tighter to give a more tailored appearance, in tune with the attire of the day. The buttons on this tunic are Victorian and the collar dogs are not present, dating the uniform to the pre 1900 era. However, there are two cuts in the collar to receive collar dogs, probably done at a later date and showing no signs of being pierced without signs of any wear. Possibly done by a collector who did not understand that collars were not applied prior to 1901. There are no moth holes and the tunic is in overall good condition, including the liner. A nice example of a tunic pattern that was used during the 1885 rebellion. These uniforms were worn with gilt and crimson sword slings slung from a web belt under the tunic skirt with a crimson sash about the waist. These additional accoutrements can be found offered on this site if you want to complete the uniform for display. The white universal or blue home service pattern, 4 or 6 panel pith helmet was worn with this uniform. With the tunic having generic Militia buttons and no collar devices it can be attributed to any of the line infantry units, including grenadiers, light infantry and regiments of the line.

WWI 1908 Web Gear

WWI 1908 Web Gear

Offered is a partial set of the 1908 web gear issued to commonwealth forces in WWI. The set includes the waist belt, cross straps, ammo pouches, small pack, mess tins, bayonet frog and bayonet, haft and the haft carrier. All in worn condition, Mostly dated items, not matched in colour and missing the shovel/carrier and canteen/straps. A good start at a complete set. You can find a shovel dated 1918 on this page, offered separately.

WWI poster

WWI poster

A really nice hard to find original WWI Canadian poster framed. Prefer to sell this locally framed to prevent damage. Call about delivery options before purchase.

WWI poster

WWI poster

A really nice hard to find original WWI Canadian poster framed. Prefer to sell this locally framed to prevent damage. Call about delivery options before purchase.

Brigadier General James Munro Ross CMG, DSO, VD Pe

Brigadier General James Munro Ross CMG, DSO, VD Pe

Offered is a collection of a CEF Brigadier General\'s personal affects from a family estate. BGen JM Ross CMG, DSO and Bar, Started the war as a volunteer from the Canadian Militia, Oxford Rifles and finished the war as the Brigade Commander of the 10th Brigade 4th Div. Originally he was a Maj with a Coy of the 29th Bn, CEF, and later took command of the Bn before his promotion to full Col and then BGen. His appointment as Brigade Commander 5th Brigade, 2nd Div, was 23 July, 1917. Before his promotion he was a Col on the Div Staff during Vimy Ridge. He was wounded in 1918 and reassigned GOC 10th Bde on his recovery. He received the DSO without citation twice as a new year award in 1917 and 1918. His CMG requires further research. Included in the collection is a gifted desk marble pen set with a plaque describing his service, his personal watch engraved with \"Major JM Ross, 29th Bn, 1914\", a standard pattern small pocket type used during the war with its special watch strap, and his various pieces of insignia. The insignia includes his 29th Bn Officers cap badge, maker marked with \"McCully, Vancouver, BC\", his Staff officer rank and cap badge when he served with Brigade staff, his various Brigadier General insignia. The General insignia includes his Generals cap badge, his shoulder rank and gorgets, his frock coat shoulder boards. A well respected and decorated officer who commanded one of the CEF best brigades during the First World War. Note: A Brigadier during the First World War wore general insignia and their rank was denoted by a single cross sword and baton shoulder rank, instead of the Second World War configuration. The set of General Officer gorgets are not shown in the picture, but are period pattern and construction.

Burbon Sword c.1815

Burbon Sword c.1815

Here we offer a beautiful example of a French Army spadroon of the post Napoleonic era. The style imitates the British pattern 1796, and yet has dainty features more common to the pillow sword of the late 18th century. With its simple wire wrapped grip, the steel hilt is provided a folding ornate shell guard featuring a raised grenade in front of the sun burst, the image repeated on the pommel, typical symbols of grenadiers and royalty. Could it have been used by a palace guard? The wire grip is a little loose, but it does not detract from the overall quality of the sword. The blade is in near mint condition with brilliant blue and gilding, highlighting crisp etched ornate decorative floral features along the blade. The scabbard is in very good condition with all of its steel parts, with only minor wear to the leather. A very fine and unique blade of the short-lived Burbon King.

1821 Infantry Sword British Import

1821 Infantry Sword British Import

During the conflicts in North America during the 19th century many Officers would purchase swords from England. These swords were made by some of England\'s top sword smiths and are always distinguished by the fact they contain none of the embellishments a British Officer would order, such as the hilt and blades containing the cypher of the reigning monarch. These swords also saw service in continental Europe as well, but were more often imported to America. The Confederates were often the biggest customers for these swords. This particular example is typical of an 1821 with its pipe back blade, the standard three bar hilt without a cypher. The hilt has the folding guard and the typical wire bound shark skin grip. The blade is in beautiful condition and is etched with floral and filigree designs. There is no coat of arms or cypher. This is a beautiful sword with an excellent scabbard with a rosette stud for a sword frog, instead of rings for sword slings. This meant the officer carrying the sword would wear a shoulder belt to carry the sword. This was a typical means of wear with US Army uniforms of the 1830s and 40s. I would date this sword of that period and would suggest if it did see American service it would be possibly during the early Indian Wars or the war with Mexico. There is no maker or distributor marks to confirm any of this speculation. A beautiful example.

1914 Equipment for MG Crew

1914 Equipment for MG Crew

Offered is a set of original 1914 equipment with some rare components, including the water bottle and carrier rig, belt, frog, holster and pistol ammo pouch, both with their integral buckles for the cross strap harness. The cross straps themselves appear to be reproductions. All in great condition, perfect for a British MG crew display.

WWI 13th Bn Sporran

WWI 13th Bn Sporran

Offered is a 13th Bn sporran with all of its parts intact and in good condition, with some minor storage damage to the black leather cantle.

Cabasset Helmet C.1600

Cabasset Helmet C.1600

The early French and English North American settlers wore armour typical of the era of the 15th century. Most armour was made in Italy, Germany, Austria and some in the Netherlands, France and to some degree England for local use. Much of the armour in England during the civil war was purchased from the continent, the Parliamentarian forces were mainly equipped by the Tower. The cabasset helmet was a common favorite and was widely used by the common soldier to protect the head from blows from swords, and other implements of war. The Italians made thousands for the arms market. Examples have been found in archeological digs in places like Jamestown. Offered here is a typical munition grade helmet with all of the standard features expected of such an example of period armour. This model is typical of Italian style and retains all of its rivets, and the construction seams are classic for the period. The hole drilled in the back rim is typical of these helmet patterns and is often thought to have been for a rope carry loop for long marches or a hook for storage. A nice example.